Health & Wellbeing Remedies Take Charge: Nutrients

Biohacking Secrets of Apples

How you can use organic apples for weight loss, lowering bad cholesterol, improving insulin resistance, reducing inflammation and improving leaky gut? During our long drive home from a recent vacation in Maine, we happened to listen to a biohacking podcast.

How you can use organic apples for weight loss, lowering bad cholesterol, improving insulin resistance, reducing inflammation and improving leaky gut.

During our long drive home from a recent vacation in Maine, we happened to listen to a biohacking podcast. In this podcast, apples were mentioned for fat loss and reducing insulin resistance. So, of course I had to dig deeper into the science including original research myself. During this rabbit hole excursion, I learned some amazing benefits of apples that left me completely in awe of nature and how our ecosystem is designed to support our health naturally.

Latest scientific research shows that ‘Organic Apples’ contain over 100 million bacteria that are beneficial to our microbiome. From peel to seed, it is important to consume all parts as they contain different strains. This is better than any probiotic you can buy from a store shelf. Apples have also been proven to help you fight obesity, fat accumulation, leaky gut and inflammation. Recent studies have demonstrated that disturbance of gut microbiota, especially the ratio of Bacteriodetes to Firmicutes phylum, is closely related to obesity and metabolic disorders. This imbalance impacts gut lining and can cause leaky gut which in turn causes inflammation. Tight gut lining junctions are key components for maintaining gut barrier integrity. While 90% of the beneficial bacteria are actually in the apple seeds which are safe to eat, the rest of the apple (stem, fruit pulp, calyx, and skin) are colonized by distinct bacterial communities. Simply put, eat all parts including seeds and make sure that it’s an organic apple. 

Besides carrying beneficial bacteria, apples have a whole long list of beneficial nutrients that promote the growth of good bacteria in the gut. For example, apple skins have a fiber called pectin. Pectin has been shown to lower cholesterol. In addition, it modulates gut microbiota, improves gut-barrier function, and reduces inflammation caused by endotoxins. Apple pectin combined with polyphenols in the apple skin have also been shown to help increase a class of beneficial bacteria in the gut called Akkermansia muciniphila affects glucose metabolism, lipid metabolism, and intestinal immunity.

The microbiome, vitamins, minerals, and other micronutrients may one day become standard available information to guide us through our nutritional needs at any given point for a healthier life. 

Apples contain beneficial bacteria for our gut


As a child, I was not a fan of apples. One of the reasons is that my dad (who passed away a few years ago) would readily cut and serve us apples whenever we got sick. He truly believed that apples are medicinal and help you get better quickly. He loved all kinds of fruit and really believed in their nutritional power. He had an innate sense of what is good for us and our ecosystems as he grew up in what we now call ‘regenerative agricultural’ family. Now that I’ve been studying Nutrition Science and reading a lot of scientific research papers, it all makes sense now. He was on to something.

So, eat more organic apples! All parts. I will be, and thinking of my dad each time.

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